CALLY TRENCH

Institute for Ground Level Mapping & Exploration

Cally Trench's homepage

Cally Trench runs the Institute for Ground Level Mapping & Exploration (IGLM&E), which specialises in art based on the exploration and celebration of unnoticed aspects of the urban environment, such as front gates, washing lines, carvings on gravestones and the emotional atmosphere in shops.

Cemetery Botany

Cally Trench
Cemetery Botany
(2014)

Twenty-five Wrought Iron Front Gates

Cally Trench
Twenty-five Wrought Iron Front Gates
(2013)

Eleven Views

Cally Trench, Eleven Views of
Fiona's Washing Line

(2008)

Emotional Atlas

Cally Trench
An Emotional Atlas of
Friars Square
(2008)

Cemetery Botany shows photographs of small carvings of flowers and plants found on late 19th or early 20th century gravestones, and coloured versions that bring the carvings to life. These stone carvings were chosen by mourners to express their feelings, or the character of the deceased, through the symbolism of plants. Some of the carvings are botanically correct; in others, flowers and leaves do not match. Many similar carvings are now decaying and neglected. They do not receive the attention and renovation given to larger grander monuments.

Twenty-five Wrought Iron Front Gates is a spotter's guide to a dying species; front gates are disappearing from our streets as front gardens are converted into parking spaces. Made of wrought iron, with curly and straight lines translated into metal, these gates are symbolic portals rather than solid defences.

An Emotional Atlas of Friars Square is based on an emotional mapping project in Friars Square Shopping Centre, Aylesbury. It aimed to map the emotional colours and patterns of each shop, without regard for the actual interior decor.

Eleven Views of Fiona's Washing Line is a zigzag book, showing a series of photographs taken at different times of the year of a laden washing line. With tumble dryers, few people use washing lines in their garden, and even people who do dry their clothes out of doors often use rotary lines. The washing line strung from a post to a tree with an ever-changing tableau of clothes blowing dry in the wind is dying out.

Cally Trench's homepage